How we would have the law changed

With the intricacies British law has developed over the centuries, it can sometimes be said that legislation is inconsistent and self-conflicting. We believe that there are laws relating to public rights of way which suffer from these problems. Because of this, we think some Acts of Parliament need clarification to really get the law straight on public rights of way.

How we would have the law changed

Some Background

In 2000, the Government enacted the Countryside and Rights of Way Act 2000, or CRoW for short. One objective of CRoW was to open up huge swathes of British countryside to the roamer, allowing the general public to enjoy parts of the country that had simply been off-limits beforehand. This part of the law is often tagged with the phrase ‘right to roam’. Although the ‘right to roam’ legislation has done a great service for many a hiker since it’s inception, it was also agreed that CRoW had to protect local communities from the sometimes-negative effect roamers can have on a location. To ensure that the land which was opened up was not subject to this negative effect, a list of the types of locations where ‘right to roam’ is not in effect was written into law and can be found under Schedule 1, Part I of the Act. Here is a summary of the first five considerations from the list, out of 17…

SCHEDULE 1 Excepted land for purposes of Part I (Part I refers to all law regarding ‘right to roam’)

  1. Land on which the soil is being, or has at…
  2. Land covered by buildings or the curtilage of such land….
  3. Land within 20 metres of a dwelling.
  4. Land used as a park or garden.
  5. Land used for the getting of minerals by surface working…

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